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Finance representative example (PCP)

Total cash price £18,299. Borrowing £14,639 with a £3,660 deposit at a representative APR of 9.9%.

49 monthly payments
£205.70
Fixed interest rate
9.9%
Total amount payable
£23,014.81
Cost of credit
£4,715.81
Optional final payment
£9,481.00
Annual mileage limit
6000 miles

Mitsubishi ASX buying guide

What Mitsubishi ASX trim levels are there?

More recent ASXs come with a simple two-step trim level range. First up is Dynamic, which includes a whole load of creature comforts such as heated front seats, LED headlights, a reversing camera and cruise control.

Exceed is the top trim level, and adds leather seats, chrome trim, a panoramic sunroof and a few extra active safety features such as blind-spot monitoring and lane-change assist. It also gets built-in sat nav, although many buyers may prefer to use the standard-fit Apple CarPlay and Android Auto to use their phone’s apps instead.

Mitsubishi ASX interior and technology

The ASX’s interior is all about simplicity and functionality. There’s a large-looking touchscreen neatly housed in the dashboard, with proper air conditioning dials below. The buttons are well marked and are easy enough to hit while on the move, and both the touchscreen and the screen between the dials are well placed to make it easy to see key info at a glance.

The infotainment system itself is easy to navigate, with large tiles on the home screen. You’ll find better graphics and quicker responses in some rivals but, if that bothers you, simply always connect your phone to the car to access your preferred navigation and media apps.

Mitsubishi ASX boot space and dimensions

Get the tape measure out and you’ll find that the ASX is a little under 4.4 metres long, which is a bit bigger than many ‘small’ SUVs and not quite as long as medium-sized SUVs like the Ford Kuga. It’s about the same size as a Peugeot 2008, and has a similarly spacious 442-litre boot. That’s more than Mitsubishi’s other smallish SUV, the Eclipse Cross. With no load lip and a wide opening, it’s easy to haul awkward items into the ASX’s boot. There’s also a ski hatch to allow you to carry long, thin items in-between two rear-seat occupants.

Mitsubishi ASX engine range explained

Mitsubishi ASX 2.0 petrol

All modern ASXs come with a 2.0-litre petrol engine pushing out 150hp, which replaced a less powerful 1.6-litre petrol in 2019. Four-wheel drive and an automatic gearbox are available with the range-topping Exceed trim. Drive in a relaxed manner and you’ll find the ASX to be comfortable and stable, and specifying the automatic gearbox gives you one less thing to think about while driving. The manual is a little quicker off the line, however.

Mitsubishi ASX FAQs

The Mitsubishi ASX steadfastly held its place in the small-to-mid-size SUV market for over a decade, and only got retired when Mitsubishi pulled out of the British car scene. As such, despite never being a best-seller, you’ll find lots of ASXs available second-hand. Every ASX is a five-door, five-seat crossover, but some come with an automatic gearbox and four-wheel drive.

Four-wheel drive was available on ASXs in the top Exceed trim with an automatic gearbox. Having four-wheel drive may provide extra wet-weather confidence if you live somewhere rural, but many buyers will be better suited to front-wheel-drive ASXs – these are more efficient and may be cheaper to maintain in the long run. A two-wheel-drive ASX with a set of winter tyres will provide excellent cold-weather grip.

The small SUV market is so full of cars that the Mitsubishi ASX struggles to appear in many ‘best SUV’ lists, but that doesn’t make it a bad car. If you want something rugged, practical, comfortable and fairly well-equipped without spending an awful lot of money, you may well like the ASX.