Audi Q2 variants
Total price
Monthly payment
Figures are based on a 20% deposit
Is the Audi Q2 worth the extra money over its rivals?

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Finance representative example (PCP)

Total cash price £13,999. Borrowing £11,199 with a £2,800 deposit at a representative APR of 9.9%.

49 monthly payments
£180.94
Fixed interest rate
9.9%
Total amount payable
£17,358.19
Cost of credit
£3,359.19
Optional final payment
£5,873.00
Annual mileage limit
6000 miles

Audi Q2 buying guide

What Audi Q2 trim levels are there?

Trim levels for post-2020 Audi Q2s are Technik, Sport, S Line, Black Edition and Vorsprung. Highlights of entry-level Technik include 16-inch alloys, LED headlights, an electric tailgate and cruise control.

Sport plays host to 17-inch alloys, sports seats, MMI Navigation and Audi Virtual Cockpit. S Line has long been a favourite among UK buyers (whichever Audi they’re buying), and for the Q2 includes 18-inch alloys, sportier bumpers, LED headlights and part-leather sports seats.

Black Edition benefits from purposeful looking upgrades such as 19-inch black alloy wheels, privacy glass and the Black Styling Pack, which adds gloss-black accents to bodywork trim. Vorsprung sits right at the top of the range, with features including adaptive suspension, panoramic sunroof, Matrix LED headlights and a Bang & Olufsen premium sound system.

Audi Q2 interior and technology

The Audi Q2 has a really clean interior design that was slightly borrowed from the current TT sports car. Models with the digital dials feel particularly plush and modern, while the air vents are reminiscent of jet engines. It may be Audi’s entry-level SUV, but the Q2 does feel pretty nice inside.

It’ll take a few frustrating prods at the screen to realise it’s not touch-controlled. Look below the gearlever and you’ll see a winged rotary dial with actual buttons, and this is how you control the various infotainment functions. 

Audi Q2 engine range explained

Audi Q2 30 TFSI petrol

Kicking off the Q2 engine range is a small-sounding 1.0-litre petrol with 110hp, badged 30 TFSI for no real reason at all. It’s reasonably quick, and is pleasingly efficient – you can expect between 45 and 50mpg if you don’t mash the throttle from every set of traffic lights. As three-cylinder engines often do, it even sounds quite sporty.

Audi Q2 35 TFSI petrol

A bigger 150hp 1.5-litre petrol engine is also available, and this could be the petrol to pick if you’re planning the occasional long journey. It gets within a whisker of the 1.0-litre engine’s fuel economy, yet is considerably quicker – both off the line and on the move. Helping the 1.5-litre engine’s efficiency is its ability to shut down two of its four cylinders under light throttle.

Audi Q2 40 TFSI quattro petrol

You might occasionally find a Q2 with a 40 TFSI badge. This signifies a 190hp 2.0-litre petrol engine, and Audi’s quattro four-wheel drive is fitted as standard. 0-62mph takes a scant 6.7 seconds – the same as a Skoda Octavia vRS hot hatch – although fuel consumption is a little higher than other petrol Q2s at 37mpg.

Audi Q2 30 TDI diesel

Diesel fans and long-distance drivers are catered for by the 1.6-litre diesel engine with 116hp, badged 30 TDI. Performance is decent enough while the promise of 60mpg will woo some buyers.

Audi Q2 35 TDI diesel

Most diesel buyers are happy with the 30 TDI, but occasionally you’ll see a 35 TDI model – a 2.0-litre TDI with 150hp. Economy is still strong and performance is better than the 30 TDI.

Audi SQ2 quattro petrol

Flying high at the top of the Q2 range is the SQ2, an almost standalone model with a huge focus on performance. It uses the same 300hp 2.0-litre petrol engine as cars like the VW T-Roc R and Cupra Ateca, and can sprint from 0-62mph in just 4.8 seconds. Be prepared for higher fuel consumption, as is usually the case with a powerful petrol engine, and note that some SQ2s cost more than £40,000 new, so are liable for the premium car tax surcharge.

Audi Q2 FAQs

Audi’s rival to the BMW X1 and Mercedes GLA came about in late 2016, as a roomy SUV to sit between the Audi A1 and A3. It was unapologetically aimed at young buyers (whether that’s young in age or young at heart!), with bold styling and a contrast-coloured rear door pillar. The Q2 was facelifted in late 2020, although the updates are hard to spot. You’ll find a mix of pre- and post-facelift cars for sale at Motorpoint.

The Q2 is available exclusively with a five-door hatchback bodyshell. At just over 4.2 metres long it slots between Audi’s A1 and A3 hatchback models. It should be very easy to park and place, especially given how square it is, and rear parking sensors are fitted on every model.

You get a 405-litre boot, which is more than both the A1 and the A3. It’s a nice, square shape that’ll be really useful for loading nice, square things into. The Q2 is spacious enough in the back, unless your friends are basketball players.

The Q2 is available with a range of petrol and diesel engines. The 30 TFSI is the entry point to the petrol line-up (a 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine), and progresses through 35 TFSI and 40 TFSI models. Diesels are badged 30 TDI, which is Audi speak for a 2.0-litre turbodiesel, while earlier models are also available with a 1.6-litre TDI.

Either six-speed manual or seven-speed dual-clutch gearboxes are available, as are front- or all-wheel drive versions – sometimes there’s a choice, sometimes your choice of engine decides which you’ll get.

The SQ2 upgrades to the most potent 2.0-litre petrol engine, and comes with the dual-clutch gearbox and all-wheel drive as standard.

The answer here depends on what you want from your car. If you're just looking for a practical compact SUV, there are dozens of more affordable options that will do the same job as the Q2.

However, if you want your compact SUV with a generous helping of premium touches, along with upmarket design and a desirable image, then the Q2 is a great buy.

What's more, there's no sacrifice needed beyond the extra price to trade into the Audi. It's excellent to drive, comes with smooth, powerful petrol engines, and feels every bit as posh as you'd hope inside and out.

Yes the Q2 is a really good car. It needs to be, however, because the compact SUV class is stuffed to the brim with excellent rivals.

The Q2 immediately stands out thanks to its angular, faceted styling borrowed from larger Audi models. This is offset by the contrast-colour C pillar behind the side windows to give it its own unique look.

From behind the wheel, the car's talents continue. The cabin is beautifully built and trimmed in upmarket materials, as well as being decked out with the brand's latest high-tech infotainment setup. On the road, the experience is effortless, especially if you choose one of the more powerful engines paired with the S Tronic automatic gearbox.

Yes Audi's quattro all-wheel-drive system is available as an option on the more powerful engines in the Q2 lineup. It also comes as standard on the high-performance SQ2.

While quattro does bring a slight improvement in grip and traction on slippery surfaces, very few Q2 owners are likely to benefit from it in normal driving. If you're concerned about how your car will perform in snowy or icy conditions, a set of winter tyres will make much more difference than swapping to a four-wheel-drive car.

All versions of the Audi Q2 should perform reasonably well in the snow. The company does offer quattro all-wheel drive on more powerful versions, but even front-wheel-drive models shouldn't struggle to tackle the cold stuff.

It's important to remember that, whatever engine and drive combo you choose for your Q2, you'll be much better off in icy and snowy weather if you fit winter tyres. These are more effective at improving grip and traction than simply trading to a four-wheel-drive car with all-season tyres.

An openable panoramic glass sunroof is available as an optional extra across the Q2 lineup. It's not likely to be a common option, however, so you might have to hunt around to find one equipped with it. It also marginally eats into rear headroom, so check you won't be carrying tall passengers regularly.